Aereo decision: a ‘narrow textual analysis?’

Professor Warren S. Grimes, who helped write an amicus brief in support of defendant Aereo in American Broadcasting Cos. et al v. Aereo Inc., kindly  followed up on his recent Q-and-A with  Biederman Blog editor Brittany A. Stone about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in this much-watched, much-discussed case: BB: I understand you were involved in filing an amicus brief in the Aereo case, on the side of Aereo.  Were you surprised at the result? WG: As part of the Southwestern Amicus Project headed by Prof. Michael Epstein, I assisted third-year law student Andrew Pletcher in drafting an amicus.  Pletcher was the primary draftsman, but he received guidance from me, from Prof. Epstein, and from others. [See video below]  We were disappointed in the result, but there is never any certainty in litigation, particularly in a hotly contested case of this sort.  One surprise for me was that in the 6-3 decision, the three justices who dissented were [Antonin] Scalia, [Samuel] Alito, and [Clarence] Thomas, justices that I would not necessarily have predicted would side with Aereo.  Both the majority and the dissent, however, were focused on a narrow textual analysis of copyright legislation, not on the broader competition and policy issues addressed in our amicus brief. Essentially, the majority opinion conceded some ambiguity in the statutory language, but sought to discern what Congress would have intended had they confronted...

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